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Are You Ready To Accept That Capitalism Is the Real Problem?

By on July 21, 2017

Before you say no, take a moment to really ask yourself whether it’s the system that’s best suited to build our future society. Jason Hickel and Martin Kirk: In February, college sophomore Trevor Hill stood up during a televised town hall meeting in New York and posed a simple question to Nancy Pelosi, the leader... Continue reading

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My one problem with the Sustainable Development Goals that drives me crazy

By on May 21, 2017

No more poverty, no more hunger. Protect the forests and oceans, clean renewable energy for all. World peace. This isn’t a John Lennon song, it’s UN policy. All these and much much more make up the Sustainable Development Goals – the globally agreed wish list for saving the world and building a better future. If... Continue reading

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C@rds in Common: Learning about the Commons Through Play

By on April 18, 2017

Because the practices of commoning fly in the face of market culture, they are frequently misunderstood.  What is this process of committed collaboration toward shared goals? people may wonder.  How does it work, especially when many industries want to privatize control of the resource or prevent competition via commoning?

Matthieu Rhéaume, a commoner and game designer who lives Montreal, decided that a card game could be a great vehicle for introducing people to the commons.  The result of his efforts is “C@rds in Common:  A Game of Political Collaboration.”  “I see playfulness as a sense-making tool,” Matthieu told me.  “People can play casually and be surprised by the meta-learning [about the commons] that results.”

It all began at the World Social Forum (WSF) conference in Montreal in August 2016. Rhéaume decided to use the opportunity to synthesize viewpoints about the commons from a group of 50 participants and use the results to develop the card game.  He persuaded the Charles Léopold Mayer Foundation and Gazibo, both based in France, to support development of the game. Fifty commoners more or less co-created the game with the help of several colleagues.  (The process is described here.)

As a game designer, Rhéaume realized that successful, fun games must embody a certain “procedural rhetoric” and reward storytelling. He had enjoyed playing “Magic: The Gathering,” a popular multiplayer card game, and wondered what that game would feel like if it were collaborative.

At the WSF, Rhéaume asked participants to share their own insights about the commons by submitting suggested cards in six categories. The first four categories consist of “commoners cards” featuring  “resources,” “action cards,” “project cards” and “attitude cards.”  Two other types of cards -- “Oppressive Forces” cards with black backs – give the game its kick by applying  “negative effects” to the “Political Arena” of play.  The two negative effects are “enclosures” and “crises,” to which commoners must collectively organize and respond in time.

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Life’s economy is primarily based on collaborative rather than competitive advantage

By on February 17, 2017

A holistic understanding of modern evolutionary biology suggests that life evolves by a process of diversification and subsequent integration of diversity through collaboration (John Stewart in BioSystems, 2014). As our focus shifts from individuals and individual species as the unit of survival to the collective of life—its complex dynamic interactions and relationships—we begin to see... Continue reading

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It Belongs to Everyone

By on March 12, 2016

We share so very much…but who does it really belong to?   The many efforts of groups around the world are converging for justice, peace, the end of poverty, the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals, and the restoration of